Survive and Thrive: Belgium!


“It sure is going to be hot this week,” I remarked to my children as I looked at the 10 day forecast.

“It’s going to be in the 70’s all week long.”

Mind you, it was July. That’s when it hit me: I had fully acclimated to life in Belgium. What did it take to get me there? Lots of patience and a willingness to explore.

3-3 Belgium Graphic

An assignment to Belgium is not like most other OCONUS tours. My spouse is assigned to the NATO base here, and while there is an American flag proudly waving near the front gate, it is part of a semi-circle of NATO flags – it doesn’t stand alone. We use Euros, rather than dollars, on the installation. Our children attend the Department of Defense Dependents School (DoDDS) alongside children from all over NATO. Our coffee shop is full of folks chattering away in many languages (although, it now proudly serves Starbucks coffee!). There is no mistaking that you are living outside of the US.

So what can make the transition to Belgium easier? Here are my top 5 tips:

  1. Bring an umbrella and some good rain gear. It rains nearly every other day here so I keep an umbrella in my purse, in my car, and one at home by the front door.
  2. Prepare to enjoy some amazing food. Our first stop with visitors from home is nearly always lunch at a cafe along the Brussels Grand Place followed by a stroll to check out the Mannequin Pis while enjoying a warm Belgian waffle loaded with whipped cream and fresh strawberries. Delicious.
  3. Learn some French. While there are three official languages in Belgium, the NATO base is in the French speaking part of the country. English is not as widely spoken here as it is near other overseas US bases. And your hopeful, “Parlez-vous anglais?” may be met with a very firm, “Non!”
  4. Bring your spirit of adventure. Not only have we been able to explore many wonderful sites in Belgium, we have also been able to travel to France, the Netherlands, Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy, Spain, and Sweden. Belgium is a great jumping off point for travel anywhere in Europe.
  5. Bring your patience. Most stores are closed on Sundays (some on Mondays, too). Restaurant meals are leisurely affairs; your waiter is not going to be working hard to turn the table, but you may be working hard to get the bill so you can leave after two or three hours. Travel along country roads requires a much more sedated speed than zipping along an American highway. You don’t want to speed over cobblestones!

3-3 Belgium Pinterest PIN

Our tour in Belgium is rapidly coming to a close, and while we are eager to return to the US where we can be near family and friends, we will miss living in Europe. Our college student is already planning a semester abroad and exploring career options that will allow her to live overseas. If that comes to pass, she can be sure that we will be visiting – often!

Have you ever been stationed in Belgium? What are your tips?

kelly-hPosted by Kelly Henry, National Military Family Association Volunteer

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