Tag Archives: military families

Are You Taking Advantage of Your Military Discount?

target-shopping-cartMilitary discounts are a great benefit offered to military families and retirees. You may have gotten into the habit of asking for a discount when you go into a restaurant or a store, but if you don’t, you should! Military discounts are also available when you shop on the internet – who knew?! Follow these tips to get the most for your dollar.

Be clear on the discount policy
Unless you regularly shop online, you may not be aware of the discounts available. Sometimes you have to hunt for the offers in small print, while other e-retailers proudly feature their policy for all to see. Some offer savings around military holidays such as Memorial Day, and others, like Lowe’s and Home Depot, offer discounts year round. When in doubt, ask!

The most common military discount is 10 to 15 percent off a total purchase. Home improvement stores, hotels, car rental agencies, clothing chains, and vehicle dealers are among the most reliable source places to save money with discounts. Some only offer savings to active duty members, while others extend it to retired service members and immediate family members.

Check coupon stacking policies
Always check the policies related to ‘stacking,’ or combining, online coupons. That’s one of the best ways to save. You might be able to combine a special holiday sale with savings from your military ID, store loyalty card points, or specific credit card bonus points. However, some retailers only allow a choice of military discount, or a special deal with a coupon from coupon websites. But that’s okay, savings is savings, right?

Look for price-matching opportunities
One of the easiest ways to save money when buying online is to take advantage of price matching policies. A store will match a competitor’s price online with some limitations: the item must be in stock at both stores, for example, and online auction sites are usually not considered competitors.

Use discounted gift cards
Another relatively new savings strategy is the use of discounted gift cards. In a nutshell, people who don’t want, or can’t use, specific gift cards will sell them online through a reseller. Why not use a $100 gift card you bought for $90? It’s like getting an instant 10% off! Be aware that scams abound in this growing market. Avoid buying gift cards on online auction websites, as they could be purchased with stolen credit cards. Stick to established resellers like Cardpool, Raise, and Card Hub.

AAFES/Exchange price-matching
Check with AAFES website, or your branch’s exchange website, for more savings and free shipping offers. You can often use manufacturers’ coupons, buy-one-get-one deals, and price matching. If you choose to use a credit card, the Military STAR card can also offer discounts and free standard shipping from e-retailers.

Military post office shipping
Amazon, Best Buy, Target, and Oriental Trading Company are among popular companies who ship to APOs and FPOs. However, many e-retailers don’t ship to military addresses because they lack an automated system to handle the Customs requirements. Consider shipping to a family member and using a forwarding service such as ShipitAPO or APO Box. If possible, you can also get free shipping by picking up an item in the store.

Protect yourself online
When shopping online, you’ll have to prove your military status to get a discount. Scanning and uploading your separation documents (DD214), Veterans Identification Card, or military ID can make you vulnerable to data-grabbing. This is especially true if you have an older card that lists your social security number. Reduce your risk by calling the 800-number. Also consider enrolling in an ID protection program, or with companies offering centralized shopping privacy protection, such as Veterans Advantage. Check your credit report for free once a year.

Your military family status offers you a world of discounts – you only have to ask and exercise reasonable caution to reap the rewards!

Have you scored big on savings with your military discounts? Let us know your tips and tricks!

Posted by Marie Hickman, a former military spouse and blogger specializing in saving money, personal finance, and frugal living. She writes for Valpak.com and other websites.

Red, White, and Zoo: If the Military Were an Animal

chesty-usmcEver thought about the mascots representing our military service branches? I wondered, so I did a little research to find out what each of them are like, and if they truly embody the branch they represent. Like Bill the Goat, beloved mascot of the Navy, or the Army’s awesome…mule? The falcon, bear, and bulldog seem strong, like the Air Force, Coast Guard, and Marine Corps, respectively.

But the more I started reading, the more I reflected on how I picture the military. As soon as an animal would come to mind, I started self-evaluating my choice. What does it say about me if I think the military is a deadly Great White shark, ravaging anything in its path? Am I prideful, or am I regretful of my military journey?

I asked a few military spouses, veterans, and active duty service members to tell me what animal they thought accurately represented the military. Surprisingly (and ironically) enough, we could start a legitimate zoo with all the different animals.

Let’s take a stroll around the ‘United States Military Zoo,’ shall we?

Work Horse
One military spouse described the military as a work horse – deprived and overworked. This species may have been a beautiful Arabian at one point, exuding beauty and prestige. Now, it’s just fallen on hard times.

Lions and Tigers
Another military spouse stood proud, claiming the military takes on the life of a tiger, with regal stripes as badges of honor, and a vibe that’s cool, calm, and collected…until it strikes and becomes deadly. Similar to the tiger, an active duty service member claims the military is definitely a lion: a symbol of strength, taking what it wants, when it wants. RAWR.

Eagle
A Marine Corps veteran was quick to tell me the military is best represented by an eagle; a beautiful, tactful, strong predator, always involved in ‘wars.’ Unfortunately, this species is currently on the endangered species list…much like the career service member.

Chameleon
Like this agile, one of a kind creature, one spouse considers the military to be much like a chameleon due to its uncanny ability to change frequently, at the drop of a hat. Most military families will agree – this is one of our super powers, and gosh, it can really be beautiful, can’t it?

Fox
This species most resembles the military, says one spouse. It’s cunning, clever, intense, adaptive, and regal; qualities that undeniably describe our armed forces.

Honey Badger
Pegged as one of the most deadly animals on the planet, the honey badger is what another spouse says her life has been like being married to the military. “It does what it wants, with no regard for anyone (or anything else). And it’ll kill you if it wants to.”

I can see qualities of each of these animals in my own military journey. Some days, I would definitely go so far as to say it’s taken on the honey badger role – leaving me feeling defeated and rocked to my core, wanting out. Other days, I get a lump in my throat watching someone thank my husband for his service, or hearing the National Anthem at a sporting event. Those days, the eagle fits just perfectly. So, does the animal we choose say anything about the person who chose it?

I don’t know, but it’s a zoo out there.

What kind of animal would you say embodies the military? Is that animal telling of your military journey? Share it with me in the comments!

shannonPosted by Shannon Sebastian, Content Development Manager

My Military Family Paid off $20k in 13 Months: Here’s How!

financial-freedomThere we were, sitting on our couch, looking at our online banking while deciding what to do for dinner. My husband and I did a double take simultaneously, “We only have $37.00 to last us until next payday…which is 5 days away.”

We were scared.

We sat quietly, surrounded by all of our things; 48” flat screen, two new cars in the driveway, brand new shoes, and that wreath for the door I just HAD to have. We were chained to our things, reflecting on how we’d gotten there.

We were both just 23 when we got married, he’d been in the military for a little over three years, and I’d only been out of college for a year, and had lived with my parents only a few months earlier. I thought we were on the straight and narrow with our finances – I had a full time job with the state government that paid me about $32,000 a year, and our rent was covered, thanks to BAH. We were golden. Or so I thought.

It wasn’t until that day with only $37.00 in our joint account that I realized we needed to find a new way to manage our money. We had no savings, and had bought a brand new bedroom set with the few thousand dollars we got from wedding guests. Newlywed life was paycheck to paycheck for us, and at the time, I thought it was okay. At least we had a nice bedroom set. In reality, we were one ‘emergency’ away from having it all come crashing down. Ironically, my husband is a Command Financial Specialist, and has counseled many other Sailors with their own finances.

So, in 2012, after 3 years of marriage, and pushing countless paychecks to the brink, we took control of our money. We didn’t want to see what would happen when the ‘rainy day’ came without a decent umbrella in tow. By this time, we had PCS’d to another state, and I had gotten a new job, paying $34,000 a year.

We decided to take a popular religious-based finance class at our local church. There, we learned how to pay down our debt in the fastest way possible – from smallest to largest. We figured out how to account for every cent and give each penny a purpose. And we stopped using our debit cards for anything except gas, and to pay our bills online.

We cut back tremendously, and used cash for everyday things: groceries, dog maintenance, and the occasional lunch or dinner out. Every other dollar went towards our debt: two car payments and school loans. By following this plan, we paid off nearly $20,000 in 13 months, on top of our usual monthly bills.

Today, we still use a ‘cash budget,’ and put hundreds, sometimes thousands, of dollars into our emergency fund each month. ‘How-in-the-world-will-we-be-able-to-pay-for-this’ emergencies are now just little inconveniences. Like the time our dog got sick while we were on vacation, and we rushed her to the doggie emergency room. Nearly 4 hours and $475 later, we paid in cash and took our fur baby home to mend.

Many military families live paycheck to paycheck – like we did.  But this does NOT have to be your reality.

February 23-28th is Military Saves Week, when service members and their families are encouraged to take the pledge to start saving and put your family on the path to financial freedom.

As an incentive for you (yes, you!) to take the pledge and start saving, if you send us a photo of who or what you’re saving for, you’ll be entered to win a $100 gift card to help get started! Send your picture to Social@MilitaryFamily.org, and be sure to include your name, email address, and what you’re saving for!

Have you found an awesome way for your military family to save money? Share it with us in the comments!

shannonPosted by Shannon Sebastian, Content Development Manager

Hold Your Applause: A Military Spouse’s Take on ‘American Sniper’

American-Sniper-movie

As new parents, we take every opportunity we can to go see movies, and when American Sniper was released, we quickly bought our tickets ahead of time. On day of the show, we shoved snacks in my purse (shh!) and headed to the theater. I brought tissues, and cursed the fact that I didn’t wear waterproof mascara that day. I read the movie was intense and may be hard to watch at times, so at least I was prepared an emotional rollercoaster—and the movie delivered.

As a military spouse, it was hard to watch. But strangely enough, I didn’t end up using the tissues. When my husband was in Afghanistan in 2008, he called me from an MWR phone room, not on a satellite phone from a fire fight. I didn’t hear gun shots and people yelling on the other end of our phone calls. He wasn’t in danger in the same way Chris Kyle was, and I’m thankful for that.

Later, my husband told me about near-misses and close calls, but nothing compared to what Taya Kyle endured on the other end of that phone. ”How could Chris put Taya through a phone call like that?” I asked my husband, “Why call your wife when you’re being shot at?” He stoically responded “Most likely, he wasn’t thinking of it like that at all. It could have been the last time he talked to her.”

I also didn’t endure the hardship of being pregnant while my spouse was deployed, nor have I had to raise our 1-year-old with a father gone much of the time, or suffering from PTSD. My husband has been an awesome partner in her care. To the spouses forced to do much of it alone: you are my heroes.

American-Sniper-the-movieMy husband had a different take on the movie. He’s lost close friends in these wars. He’s attended far too many memorial services in his decade of Army service. One of his closest friends from ROTC was killed in her Humvee just weeks before she was slated to return home. And when I first met my husband in 2007, he was wearing the black KIA bracelet with her name on it …a name that would later become our daughter’s middle name.

As the movie ended, there were photos of Chris Kyle, his family, his brothers in arms, and his memorial service. My husband told me this was the hardest part of the movie for him to watch. The theater was completely silent as people filed out. We left the theater once the actual credits began to roll, still in complete silence, wrapping up our trash as quietly as possible.

That silence is what has stayed with me. I’ve seen movies where the audience applauded at the end, so I wondered how moviegoers would show respect for this story at the end of this film. Applause just didn’t feel right. A moment of silence out of respect for Chris Kyle was so much more impactful. And, if #AmericanSniper tweets are any representation, it seems that’s the way it’s been throughout much of the country.

Though the story was incredibly tragic, ultimately, it’s serving a purpose: educating our country about the dangers of PTSD. Though we were all silent as we exited the theater that day, we must not remain silent on this important issue. If you know someone you think may be suffering from PTSD, please support them in finding help. Say something and possibly save a life.

Have you seen American Sniper? How did the movie make you feel? Tell us what you thought of this amazing film in the comments below!

Melissa-JudyPosted by Melissa Judy, Social Media and Brand Manager

‘Tis the Season of Giving: Help Give Military Families Hope

While this holiday season is just a few weeks long, for military families, the giving is year round. They give up time with their loved one, special moments with their children, and spend holidays away from their own families. And some are struggling.

The transition home has not been equally kind to all our military families. And when things are not going well, the holidays can accentuate the difficulties.

But you and I can give them hope this holiday season. Through our unique and powerful Operation Purple® programs we can give them what they hope for.

They hope to make up lost time with their children.

goodbye

 They hope for an even stronger relationship with their spouse.

spouse-hugging

They hope for peace on Earth, so others will not face the sacrifices they have.

family-together

Military families have done so much for us, please help us give them new hope for their own future.

A Full Home and a Full Heart, Thanks to 3 Midshipmen

macy-comes-home-087It’s just before Thanksgiving and our house is abuzz with excitement. You can feel it; the anticipation of days off from school, delicious food, and decorating for the upcoming Christmas holiday. You know–it’s that cozy, warm, fullness in your heart feeling. The holidays. Friends, family, and magical moments with the people you love.

But every now and again, for us military families, you get hit with an intense moment of loneliness. I felt it the other day when I was walking through the parking lot on the way home from running some errands. The wind blew and made the air chilly for Southern California… and I felt it. The need for my family. For the traditions from home. And for those friends who’ve known me since I was young. I feel it at least once every year during the holiday season and this year is no different.

Our assignments with the Air Force have all been full with new experiences and adventures, and amazing people who I am so grateful to know. I have loved all of our assignments, but the one I hold on extra tight to is our time in Annapolis, Maryland when my husband (remember, he’s Air Force) was a professor of Engineering at The United States Naval Academy.

This assignment was special for many reasons, but what made it extra special was our experience as a Sponsor Family for several young Midshipmen from The Naval Academy. We signed up to be a sponsor family within days of arriving in Annapolis, and I was so eager for the experience. Little did I know, these three particular young men would end up meaning so much to all of us.

Weekend after weekend, we would drive to the Academy promptly at 12 noon, and our 3 Plebes (freshman) would pile into the minivan, crisp in their uniforms, sitting among the car seats. Duffle bags of laundry in hand, we would drive home, and for the next 12 hours (they had to be back no later than 12 midnight) our home was their home. They would sleep, eat (oh, they ate so much), play with the kids, help around the house, do their laundry, study, and watch A LOT of TV.

These boys became like my sons–my kids’ older brothers. They were at our house the day we brought our 3rd child, Macy, home from the hospital. I will never forget taking pictures of these boys holding 2 day old Macy. They were at our house just days after my own father unexpectedly passed away. We always did our best to be there for them; break ups with girlfriends, failed tests, and when one of them also unexpectedly lost his father. Three years of ups and downs.

I loved having them around the most during the holidays, when the semester was winding down for them, and the buzz of going home to family and friends occupied their thoughts. That feeling of loneliness, longing for family and old friends, wasn’t as strong. My home was full, and my heart, fuller.

Cooking and decorating was more enjoyable knowing it was going to be enjoyed by, not only by us, but our “Mids,” as well. Those three young men, although they had no idea, were giving our family an extra purpose, an extra drive to make our house feel warm and welcome. They made our time in Annapolis meaningful. Although we opened our home and time to them, they gave us so much more.

Being a sponsor family is an experience I will always look back on with a grateful heart. Sadly, we weren’t in Annapolis for their entire four years at the Academy because the Air Force moved us to Los Angeles at the end of their junior year. Text messages and emails show up often, with updates from life in the Navy and Marine Corps.

I hope they will always know how special they were to our family, how often they cross our hearts, and even though they are no longer students, we are always here for them. And nothing will change that.

Jenny-ZollarsPosted by Jenny Zollars, Air Force Spouse

Dave Attell and 4 Comedians Whose Names Start with “J” Supporting Military Families

When we first met comedian Dave Attell more than a year ago, we never could have imagined where we’d be together today. After performing at a fundraiser and being disappointed with the amount of donations we received, Dave gave NMFA $25,000… and then a few weeks later another $25,000, along with a promise to do more to help military families. This Veterans Day in New York City, Dave came through on that promise, big time.

He invited some of the top comedians in the world to join him on stage for “A Salute to Military Families,” a benefit at the Gotham Club in our honor. Besides Dave, a superstar himself, here was the lineup:

Jamie Kahler: Navy vet and host on the American Heroes Channel (AHC)
Jeffery Ross: the Roastmaster on Comedy Central
Judah Friedlander: best known for his role as Frank Rossitano on 30 Rock
Jim Gaffigan: author of bestseller “Fat Dad” and “Food: A Love Story”

These guys, whose names all happen to start with a “J,” kept the side-splitting laughs going all night. They also took the time to hang out before the show and get to know the military families, veterans, and friends of NMFA who’d be in the audience.

Thank you, Dave, for being the host with the most—and for caring about military families.

Together we are stronger.

Donate to our mission today.

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