MilFams: Win a FREE House Cleaning from Merry Maids!

boxes-in-man-roomWith a few PCS moves under my belt, this is what’s left of the unpacked boxes inside my house. We moved in a year ago. That’s a win, right? Military families know boxes will inevitably move from state to state, sometimes country to country, and most likely won’t be opened for whatever reason. The unpacked boxes become a shrine of collected moving stickers–you know the ones. I won’t even talk about the chaos in my garage right now. I couldn’t tell you what’s in half of the boxes sitting out there.

Each time we prepare to move, I tell myself this time I’ll get rid of all the extra stuff, donate, purge, and move to our next home simplified and ready to unpack.

Easier said than done.

And once you finally get in the right mental state (because it is totally necessary, isn’t it?!) to start unpacking, placing things in their new spots, and turning your house into a home, you’re left with packing paper, empty boxes, and a house begging for a deep clean.

That’s where Merry Maids comes in.

garage-2Our Association has partnered with Merry Maids, a premier home cleaning company with over 30 years of experience to give five lucky military families a free house cleaning in honor of National Military Family Appreciation Month!

To enter: send us a photo of your house at it’s messiest (via Facebook or email to Social@MilitaryFamily.org) by November 30, 2014. A winner will be selected in each of Merry Maids’ five regions.

About that garage–you thought I was kidding, didn’t you?

What are your tips for cleaning up and unpacking? Share your tips with us!

shannonPosted by Shannon Sebastian, Content Development Manager

America’s Parade 2014 in Photos: We Love Our Military Families!

What a beautiful day to march down 5th Avenue! For the first time ever, our Association participated in America’s Parade, New York City’s famed event honoring Veterans Day. Families who’ve attended NMFA Operation Purple Camps marched alongside our staff and their families waving to hundreds of thousands of spectators who lined the streets. It was an honor to represent the families who stand behind the uniform. Thank you, Discovery, for sponsoring our float!

Photos: By Jmill Photography

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The Few, the Proud: Happy 239th Birthday, Marine Corps!

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30 Ways in 30 Days to be a Grateful Nation

Sure, we see American flags flying in yards, and we clap for service members getting off their planes at the airport. But are we really being a grateful Nation?

Our Association is teaming up with 29 other organizations and military movers-and-shakers to bring you 30 Days of Thanks. By following along using the hashtag #30Days, each day you’ll see a quick idea you can do to show your appreciation during Military Family Month.

But don’t limit yourself to 30 days! The yellow ribbon of military support is unraveling–and with your act of kindness, donation, or appreciation, we can show our service members and their families we stand proudly behind them all year long.

Don’t miss out on each day’s video! Follow along or watch them, and take a peek at today’s way to show thanks!

Do you plan to share this quick idea to help make a #GratefulNation?

shannonPosted by Shannon Sebastian, Content Development Manager

One Month Isn’t Enough: Who Really Cares About Military Families?

Each year, a Presidential Proclamation declares November as Military Family Month. Most years, it doesn’t even make national news. The backbone of our Nation’s military, the supporters behind the uniform, the ones who rise to meet the challenge of serving silently—military families hardly receive a minute of recognition.

Does anyone really care about military families?

Military families not only need your encouragement and support, they deserve it.

Here are four reasons why:

Reason #1: The Romesha Family

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Tammy Romesha, Army wife, and mother of three, manned the homefront while her husband did tours in Kosovo, Korea, and Iraq. After a violent tour in Afghanistan, where SSgt Clint Romesha’s outpost was overran by insurgents, injuring him and 22 others, and killing eight Soldiers, Tammy stood strong and supported her husband’s love for the Army. SSgt Romesha was awarded the Medal of Honor in February 2013 for leading the efforts to retake the overrun outpost. Today, Tammy sits on our Association’s Board of Advisors, lending knowledge, perspective, and support to our mission to advocate for other military families.

Reason #2: Military Kids

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A recent study found that about 1/3 of military children report symptoms of anxiety. These kids have worries that most normal adults don’t—stressors like deployed parents, frequent moves, and sometimes a parent’s injury. But military kids are resilient, and we’ve seen it firsthand. This Operation Purple Camper had a blast during her time at camp. One of three kids to a Retired Army dad, and a former military mom, she is a shining example of how military kids are able to thrive despite the challenges they face.

Reason #3: The Sisson Family

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Since losing their son, 2nd Lt. Justin Sisson, to injuries sustained when an IED exploded on his walking patrol in June 2013, the Sisson family has spent each day since remembering the life he left behind and thinking of legacy he never had the chance to create. Many Gold Star families—who have lost loved ones to war—share the same fear: that their loved one will be forgotten. Through the creation of a scholarship fund, annual memorial 5k races, and the outpouring of support, the Sissons continue to keep their son’s spirit and sacrifice alive.

Reason #4: Amy Chaffin

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During her three years as a military spouse Volunteer with our Association, Amy has raised important issues, such as the Army’s change in background checks, requiring those who volunteer with children to agree to have their medical and behavioral health records reviewed. Not only did Amy raise the issue, but she provided well-thought out reasons why this is problematic, and continued to follow the issue and provide subsequent information. Military spouses, like Amy, not only support their own service members, but lend their support beyond their own kitchen table, reaching out to their communities, military installations, and their fellow military spouses.

Though the Presidential Proclamation only declares November as Military Family Month, our Association believes every single day is Military Family Day. Join us every month as we honor, appreciate, and support the ones who make it possible for their service member to serve without hesitation.

Do you know any amazing military families who deserve recognition? Who would you add to the list?

shannonPosted by Shannon Sebastian, Content Development Manager

The Most Important Day of the Year

besa-and-dave-votedEven fourteen years before I could vote, Election Day was a big deal to me. My dad would dress in a suit, put on his American flag pin and take me to the polling station near our house in Houston, Texas. No matter how long the line, my dad shared smiles and hellos with fellow voters, and told me why Election Day is the most important day of the year.

“More important than birthdays?” I’d ask.

“The most important day,” he’d say.

My dad is an Albanian, born and raised in the former Yugoslavia. Not only did he grow up in a place without voting rights, but even speaking your mind at all about political leaders could get you killed.

When my dad became a citizen in 1981, it was just as much about the voter registration card as the passport. All those debates we watched over the years would end in more than a heated conversation at the television. Finally, he could show his support for what was most important to him.

This past weekend, my husband– who’s almost as passionate about voting as my dad– went to cast his ballot early to avoid the lines.

“It’s going to be crazy on Election Day,” he reminded me.

“I sure hope so,” I told him.

It’s a madness many countries around the world are denied.

I hope the lines are long. I hope everyone who has the opportunity to vote exercises that right. I hope that, when you’re in line, you smile at the people around you and take in the day. I hope you take your kids with you; I’ll certainly take mine. I hope you educate yourself about the issues that matter and vote for the candidates who care about what you care about.

And I hope you rock that “I voted” sticker all day long.

Do you think it’s important for military families to vote? Tell us in the comments!

Besa-PinchottiPosted by Besa Pinchotti, Communications Director

A Different Kind of Halloween: How Transition Changed Things

halloween-katieGhosts. Goblins. Princesses. A young Marine. Families dressed as the Jake and the Never Land Pirate characters. These are my 10 years of Halloween memories.

I love celebrating Halloween on a military base. I love the deep sense of community. I love the designated trick or treat hours in military housing. I love the fire pits and pot lucks and general good will in the community.
I felt safe and secure taking our young son to trick or treat on a military base.

But, this year will be different.

This is the first year we are a Veteran family. My husband is no longer active duty and he is not retired. He was medically separated after going through the Integrated Disability Evaluation System (IDES), along with a medical board. The entire process took about 12 months. IDES was complicated to navigate on its own, but add in my husband’s various medical appointments to the mix, and I’d say our transition out of the military was complex. We encountered many highs and lows during the entire process; it would have been awesome to have more resources or peer support to help me, as a spouse, help my husband and our family navigate through our transition.

With 1.5 million service members leaving the military in the next 5 years, transition from military to civilian life is, or will become, a reality for many military families.

halloween-katie-2And transition is hard–both emotionally and physically draining.
In fact, our Association hosted a Transition Roundtable event to talk about the needs of families during the transition process. We fielded a survey asking military families who have transitioned, or who anticipate transition, to share their top concerns.

Three out of four are stressed, or very stressed, about transition. They identified their top concerns as: being financial prepared, finding employment for the service member, accessing post-military health care, finding behavioral and emotional support, and understanding Veteran Affairs’ benefits and the claims process.

Our roundtable was the beginning of a conversation about transition. We’ll cover your top concerns, identify gaps, and develop resources to help YOU and YOUR FAMILY successfully transition from military to civilian life.

This year you won’t find our Jake, Izzy, or Cubby on your military base, but instead you’ll find a family of Super Heroes creating new memories in our hometown bravely navigating our transition from military to civilian life.

Has your family transitioned out of the military? Is transition around the corner? What are your top concerns?

katie2Posted by Katie Savant, Government Relations Information Manager