Category Archives: Make a difference

‘Board’ering Awesome! #WayBackWednesday

Our Board of Directors is integral in the day-to-day operations at our Association. We have an awesome team of leaders keeping our mission to support and strengthen military families in the forefront of our daily work. From securing partnerships and donations, to promoting our Association through the media, and planning our advocacy efforts, our Directors do it all– just like those pictured here, in 1983!

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Storming the Hill Since 1969! #WayBackWednesday

It’s the 1990s, and our Association is making waves on Capitol Hill. During this decade, we released an innovative health care plan for military families, which included recommendations that were later incorporated into TRICARE.

Twenty years later, we are still on the forefront of TRICARE issues, including those controversial topics that your military family needs answers to. Not finding the answers you need? Leave us a comment and let us know how we can help!

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Join Our Association Today! #WayBackWednesday

We’ve come a long way since our early information tables, like this one in 1983, when we were still known as the National Military Wives Association! Whether we had handmade signs, or awesome goodies like our Volunteers today, our mission has never wavered: advocating for programs and benefits that strengthen and protect our Nation’s uniformed services families.

Have you considered becoming a member of our Association? With an annual fee less than what you’d spend on Starbucks in a week, you’ll not only directly help support military families with your donation, but you’ll also be eligible to join PenFed Credit Union, and receive updates on our advocacy efforts.

As our festive information table says, Help Make a Difference: JOIN TODAY!

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Taking Risks: “You can’t learn how to fly, unless you fly.”

shadow-of-womanDr. Regina Dugan was the first female Director at Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and is now Vice President of Engineering and leader of the Advanced Technology and Projects  group at Google.

In 2012, during a TED talk, Dr. Dugan asked, “What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?”

She said, “If you really ask yourself this question, you can’t help but feel uncomfortable. Because when you ask it, you begin to understand how the fear of failure constrains you, how it keeps us from attempting great things…The path to truly new, never-been-done-before things always has failure along the way…We cannot both fear failure and make amazing new things.”

This has been a guiding principle for me since I heard her talk.

What would I do if I knew I would not fail?

Here’s an example: what would I do to support military families if I knew I would not fail? I’m happy to report that the answer is – exactly what I’m doing now. I’m leading our Association in the development of a new communication tool using a mobile app, called MyMilitaryLife.

To be honest, the don’t-be-afraid-to-fail mentality is part of the National Military Family Association personality. As an Association, we’ve done truly new, never-been-done-things.

Our Association is a built on a foundation started by women in the ‘60’s. In the 80’s, we convinced Congress to pass a bill to benefit military families living in an area no one had constituents – overseas. More recently, our advocacy organization started a summer camp program, fondly known as Operation Purple Camps. We changed the way we think about military spouse education through our innovative scholarship program.

Looking back, we would have never been able to send nearly 50,000 military kids to camp if we were constrained by fear. We would have never been able to risk investing $2.5 million in military spouses to advance their education if we were afraid to try new things. And we would have never been able to harness the power of technology to make our military families’ lives easier if we didn’t attempt the next great thing.

Is it scary? You betcha.

Is it risky? Yep.

Did we have failures along the way? Sure. It is part of the learning process. Regina Dugan explained, “you can’t learn how to fly, unless you fly.”

But is it worth it? ABSOLUTELY.

What would you do if you knew you would not fail?

michellePosted by Michelle Joyner, Mobile Initiatives Director

#OurVolunteersRock: Meet Jackie, our “OORAH” Historian!

Jackie-history-projectShe sat in the back of an undesirable office space with her eyes peering through a magnifying glass, garnering clues from an old photo. Minutes later, she ambled down the hall to let me know a water logged ceiling panel had just crashed to the floor, barely missing her head. She wasn’t worried about her safety; she wanted to protect the historical papers and pictures she was investigating! I immediately knew I wasn’t managing the average Volunteer.

Who is this special Volunteer? She is Colonel Marguerite J. Campbell, United States Marine Corps, Retired.

At the National Military Family Association, we call her Jackie!

She was commissioned in 1967 as a Second Lieutenant in the Marine Corps. Yes, a FEMALE officer in the Marine Corps in the 60’s! It wasn’t an unusual choice for her to make – she had grown up the daughter of a USMC Master Sergeant. Her father was the first to salute her at her commissioning! Jackie never makes a big deal about being a female in what was, and still is, a predominately male world, but she does note that she had to ask the permission of her superiors to become a mother.

Here are some of the highlights of her fascinating career:

Jackie was an Administrative Officer.
She commanded the Women Marines of D-2 in 1974 and 1975.
She spent many years as the Protocol Officer at the United States European Command (EUCOM).
Jackie served two Joint Tours at the Pentagon and was the J2J5 Joint Specialty Officer for Colin Powell.

When you pop into her cubicle in our new office space, she might share some stories of famous military leaders and presidents she has come in contact with during her stellar career.

But that’s not all! She’s also a professional chef! After her retirement from the Corps in 1993, Jackie pursued another passion, and graduated from Johnson and Wales University. She worked as a caterer and chef for 10 years, and last week, she made a glorious 15 pound poached salmon for a special church event!

And if the Marine and chef experiences aren’t fascinating enough, just ask her about her husband (also a retired Marine), her three daughters, six granddaughters, two great grandchildren and seven cats! She beams with pride when speaking about her family.

In 2011, she was asked to sort, organize, and label photos and documents of our Association’s history. Three years later, Jackie has created a filing system for all of our history, and she continues to add to it. Jackie has logged almost 300 volunteer hours with our Association so far this year!

In a time when volunteerism is dwindling, Jackie is a rare gem. She volunteers diligently to preserve the history of the National Military Family Association. She also volunteers for the Armed Forces Hostess Association at the Pentagon.

Oh how I wish we could clone her!

Lets give a big “OORAH” to our retired Colonel, friend, and Volunteer Historian, Jackie Campbell!

Does a Volunteer you know have a special story? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!

meredithPosted by Meredith Moore, Volunteer Services Coordinator, National Capital Region

Got $10? That’s All You Need to Help Military Families!

soldier-hugging-dadThere’s a quote that we like to refer to at the National Military Family Association:

“The strength of our Soldiers is our Families.”
-General Raymond T. Odierno, General and 38th Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army

Our Association serves the family- and you can too!

This week only, we need as many people as possible to donate just $10 towards our Crowdrise Veteran’s Charity Challenge 2 fundraiser!

The charity that gets the most individual donations wins $2,500—putting us that much closer to the grand prize of $20,000.

Here’s what $20,000 would do for military families:

  • Fund the education and career path for 20 military spouses
  • Send 40 children to an Operation Purple camp, or
  • Host 10 families at a Family Retreat!

Tell your friends, share it on Facebook, and help us win this week’s challenge!

Click here to donate!

Thanks for your support – we couldn’t do it without you!

carolinePosted by Caroline Rasmus, Development and Membership Manager

“525,600 minutes – How Do You Measure a Year?”

nateIt’s hard for me to come terms with the fact that my year of service as an AmeriCorps member with the National Military Family Association has come to a close. I’ve laughed and I’ve cried. I’ve grown and I’ve learned. I’ve gained even more respect for the men and women in the seven Uniformed Services (I learned there are seven, and not just five) and those who love them back home.

By far, my favorite part of working here has been interacting directly with our military families. I had the privilege to attend many prestigious events over the last year that I would not have otherwise. I have witnessed families reconnect and overcome injuries at the Operation Purple Healing Adventures. I helped guide military families to the resources and services available to them at numerous exhibitions and fairs.

I wept as gay and lesbian service members and their spouses and families were recognized at the American Military Partners Association Inaugural Gala. As a gay man, I was particularly inspired to see the LGBT military community finally able to come together in the open, and throw an event just for themselves. I know a few years ago, before the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, such an event would have been impossible without the fear of discharge. I was proud our Association was a Silver Sponsor of the gala, showing support for ALL military families and celebrating diversity.

Beyond my direct service, I’ve learned the National Military Family Association is just that— one big family. We’ve had potlucks galore, a party every possible chance, and a few office competitions to keep things interesting. I can’t say there’s a single person in our office who I won’t miss when I leave, especially the ladies (and Zac!) that make up the rest of the Government Relations Department.

  • Katie, despite the physical distance between us, you’ve been integral in teaching me how the Association works, and I’ll always appreciate the help you’ve given me throughout the year.
  • Eileen, you always put a smile on my grumpy morning face with your cheerful kindness, and you always made me feel so welcome here.
  • Karen, for the rest of my life, thanks to you, I’ll think about the research that goes into every product, especially car trunks, and remember all the zany stories you have to share about your family.
  • Brooke, you’ve been a great mentor and advisor, giving me realness when I needed it. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.
  • Zac, I’ve enjoyed having our high-level intellectual chats, and thanks for bringing some much-needed extra testosterone into the department!
  • Natalie, there’s a million things I could say about the friendship I’ve developed with you, but I don’t know where to start, so I’ll just say I’ll miss you.
  • Finally, Kathy, thanks for taking a chance on a small-town Midwestern boy who had dreams of working in the nation’s capital. I’ve learned so much from you over the last year that I will carry on during the rest of my professional lifetime, as well as my personal one. I don’t know if I’ll ever find a more caring and understanding supervisor. Thank you for making me a part of your family.

To my entire family here at the National Military Family Association, I’d like to say thanks for all the love you’ve given me, and “See ya later!” because goodbye is far too permanent.

natePosted by Nate Parsons, Americorps Member