Category Archives: Make a difference

22 Lives Taken is Too Many: Clay Hunt SAV Act Signed by President Obama

clay-hunt-act-signing-paul-rieckhoffWhile Paul Rieckhoff, founder and CEO of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), stood in front of 22 American Flags, he proudly recapped this historic day – one that he, and IAVA led the charge for. And I was left with goosebumps.

After hours on the phone, storming the Hill, and making sure our veterans are taken care of, IAVA and hundreds of others were there to watch President Barack Obama sign the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans (SAV) Act into law. This Act will help aid in the prevention of veteran and active duty suicides among our service men and women.

“22 veterans commit suicide every day. If we can save just one life, this was all worth it,” Reickhoff reiterated at IAVA’s reception, following the bill’s signing.

My goosebumps came from the electric feeling of community that flowed through the room..

“This community that focuses on principles over politics is what made this happen,” Rieckhoff said. And we all felt it; this bill did not become law on its own. It took hundreds of people, working hours on end, to make sure the spotlight didn’t fade on our veterans. It also took Clay’s spirit.

“Clay Hunt was courageous. He was inspiring. He was awesome. This act will help continue his purpose,” Senator Bob McDonald shared.

Military service members, veterans, and their families need our support more than ever. President Obama encouraged those struggling, “If you are hurting, you are not forgotten, you are not alone. America is here for you. We need you.”

Congratulations to IAVA, and everyone involved in this extremely important and meaningful cause. You are helping to save the lives of our current and future veterans.

If you, or someone you know, are hurting, know that it’s okay to ask for help. Reach out, we’re here for you.

Jordan-BarrishPosted by Jordan Barrish, Public Relations Manager

The Most Important Day of the Year

besa-and-dave-votedEven fourteen years before I could vote, Election Day was a big deal to me. My dad would dress in a suit, put on his American flag pin and take me to the polling station near our house in Houston, Texas. No matter how long the line, my dad shared smiles and hellos with fellow voters, and told me why Election Day is the most important day of the year.

“More important than birthdays?” I’d ask.

“The most important day,” he’d say.

My dad is an Albanian, born and raised in the former Yugoslavia. Not only did he grow up in a place without voting rights, but even speaking your mind at all about political leaders could get you killed.

When my dad became a citizen in 1981, it was just as much about the voter registration card as the passport. All those debates we watched over the years would end in more than a heated conversation at the television. Finally, he could show his support for what was most important to him.

This past weekend, my husband– who’s almost as passionate about voting as my dad– went to cast his ballot early to avoid the lines.

“It’s going to be crazy on Election Day,” he reminded me.

“I sure hope so,” I told him.

It’s a madness many countries around the world are denied.

I hope the lines are long. I hope everyone who has the opportunity to vote exercises that right. I hope that, when you’re in line, you smile at the people around you and take in the day. I hope you take your kids with you; I’ll certainly take mine. I hope you educate yourself about the issues that matter and vote for the candidates who care about what you care about.

And I hope you rock that “I voted” sticker all day long.

Do you think it’s important for military families to vote? Tell us in the comments!

Besa-PinchottiPosted by Besa Pinchotti, Communications Director

Silently Serving: Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and each day, military families face this silent war in their own homes. Over the last five years, the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps, together, averaged just less than 8,000 domestic violence complaints per year. 

And the domestic violence battle rages on, thanks to the rough road spouses face when they report domestic abuse. We urge the Department of Defense to create a better environment for reporting abuse, so spouses can ask for help and know they’ll get it.

Military families shouldn’t serve silently.

For information on Military Protective Orders, or other resources to help, visit: www.MilitaryOneSource.mil, or www.MilitaryFamily.org.

Read more about DoD’s efforts to prevent and treat domestic violence,

Lessons Learned Washing the Vietnam Memorial Wall

The first time I visited the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was in 1983 while on a family vacation to DC. There was something powerful about that memorial, even to a 6-year-old. I stared, moved by the people tracing the names of their loved ones on pieces of paper to take home with them. So when our Association had the opportunity to wash the wall, I was honored and proud to participate with my family.

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Here’s what I learned from the experience:

There’s a reason you wash the wall early in the morning. A 5:30 wakeup isn’t always appealing, but even without coffee, I felt energized watching the sun rise behind the Washington Monument while we washed the wall. Plus, it’s the only time of day the wall isn’t flooded with tourists.

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Kids are actually helpful. Washing the fingerprints and smears off the granite isn’t physically difficult, but it can be emotionally draining. In fact, the memorial was created to help the 3 million who served with the healing process. Seeing the kids, elbow deep in suds, scrubbing the bottom part of the wall brought levity and life to the experience.

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The wall was controversial, like the war. Everything about Vietnam was marred in controversy, even a memorial to those who served. The design was the result of a nationwide contest, and the entries were judged anonymously. 21-year-old Maya Lin, a student at Yale, came up with the winning design. Some said that only listing tens of thousands of names may as well be a tribute to anti-war activist Jane Fonda. Some even called it ‘a nihilistic slab of stone.’ The statue of three American soldiers was later added as a compromise.

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What some see as a chore, others see as an honor. My dad, originally from Kosovo, was perhaps the most energetic wall washer in our group. He stood alone with the hose, even when others had moved on, paying extra care to each name. He shared that, in communist countries, people are forced to clean war memorials, which are built to honor communist leaders and their ideology—not the people who fought; it’s not something you volunteer for. He went on to explain to the group why this particular experience meant so much to him. “America is seen as a beacon of hope for people around the world,” he said. “Each time America sent troops to parts of the former Yugoslavia, they saved thousands of lives. I can’t think of anything more important than honoring those soldiers.”

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One of the most beautiful parts of the wall washing was seeing the reflections of my fellow volunteers in the wall as they worked to clean it. As the park ranger so eloquently put it, “we are all a part of that wall.”

Have you ever been particularly moved by a service project? Tell us about it in the comments below.

Photos: By JMill Photography, 2014

Besa-PinchottiPosted by Besa Pinchotti, Communications Director

‘Board’ering Awesome! #WayBackWednesday

Our Board of Directors is integral in the day-to-day operations at our Association. We have an awesome team of leaders keeping our mission to support and strengthen military families in the forefront of our daily work. From securing partnerships and donations, to promoting our Association through the media, and planning our advocacy efforts, our Directors do it all– just like those pictured here, in 1983!

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Storming the Hill Since 1969! #WayBackWednesday

It’s the 1990s, and our Association is making waves on Capitol Hill. During this decade, we released an innovative health care plan for military families, which included recommendations that were later incorporated into TRICARE.

Twenty years later, we are still on the forefront of TRICARE issues, including those controversial topics that your military family needs answers to. Not finding the answers you need? Leave us a comment and let us know how we can help!

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Join Our Association Today! #WayBackWednesday

We’ve come a long way since our early information tables, like this one in 1983, when we were still known as the National Military Wives Association! Whether we had handmade signs, or awesome goodies like our Volunteers today, our mission has never wavered: advocating for programs and benefits that strengthen and protect our Nation’s uniformed services families.

Have you considered becoming a member of our Association? With an annual fee less than what you’d spend on Starbucks in a week, you’ll not only directly help support military families with your donation, but you’ll also be eligible to join PenFed Credit Union, and receive updates on our advocacy efforts.

As our festive information table says, Help Make a Difference: JOIN TODAY!

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