Making a difference in the lives of military families

maryann-makekau-2

I took note of the uniformed soldiers passing by me in this morning’s airport shuffle. “Thank you,” I said with a nod and a smile. Given that an estimated million children have had one or both parents deploy to war, I thought: Are these troops returning from a combat zone or heading to one of the worldwide locations our Armed Forces occupy? Perhaps others are taking well-deserved leave time.

Communities have magnified understanding and support during our Nation’s 12 years at war. As one Vietnam War veteran reported in The Sojourn, “I think the public opinion has shifted 180 degrees … they do everything they can now to support, honor, encourage, care for the veterans.”

With more than 1 million service members transitioning to civilian life over the next five years, campaigns like Got Your 6 are working to bridge the civilian-military gap to ensure “veterans and military families are perceived as leader and civic assets.”

It’s been nearly thirty years since I’ve worn the uniform. My father was initially apprehensive, having served in the National Guard during a time in history when women didn’t readily join the ranks. This Veterans Day afforded the opportunity for my father and me to share military stories, face-to-face, for the first time since my enlistment. My position in military life shifted over the years, and so did Dad’s attitude. As I made the transition from active duty to career military spouse raising two “brats,” my parents praised the Air Force umbrella over my family.

Alongside Veterans Day, November marks National Military Family Appreciation Month as another opportunity to recognize our Nation’s troops and their families. Among those working to make a difference is Cody Jackson, known as “One Boy USO.” He’s been greeting and thanking our troops at airports for five years. He has sent over 4,500 pounds of care packages and he’s just 10 years old.

While moving is an inherent part of military life, it isn’t necessarily easy. The vast majority of military kids will have moved six to nine times prior to graduating high school. One of my children rolled with the changes, the other detested it and even climbed a tree refusing to be re-rooted during one of their six moves. Ironically, our “tree-hugger” child has now moved even more in her adult life, and loves it!

Military spouses must also find ways to navigate the interruptions in family life and careers. In recognizing the frequent moves, remote locations, and child care responsibilities, Hiring Our Heroes’ nationwide initiative strives to provide spouses with a path to find transferable, rewarding careers.

November is also Warrior Care Month. Advancements in battlefield medicine and body armor, have led to unprecedented numbers of service members surviving severe wounds or injuries. Recovering warriors, and caregivers alike, are among those needing our nation’s recognition and support – they have, no doubt, made a sacrifice for our own lives. Let us strive to make a difference in theirs, too.

How have military service members and their families made a difference in your life?

maryann-makekauGuest Post by Maryann Makekau, USAF veteran, author, and founder of Hope Matters

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